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Methods Expansion of a food composition database for the food frequency questionnaire in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES): a comprehensive database of dietary antioxidants and total antioxidant capacity
Jiseon Lee1,2orcid , Ji-Sook Kong1,2orcid , Hye Won Woo1,2orcid , Mi Kyung Kim1,2orcid
Epidemiol Health 2024;e2024050
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2024050 [Accepted]
Published online: May 10, 2024
1College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea
2Institute for Health and Society, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea
Corresponding author:  Mi Kyung Kim,
Email: kmkkim@hanyang.ac.kr
Received: 13 December 2023   • Revised: 17 April 2024   • Accepted: 26 April 2024
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OBJECTIVES
This study constructed a comprehensive database of dietary antioxidants and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) to facilitate the estimation of daily antioxidant intake using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). This database was applied to 3 general population-based cohorts (n=195,961) within the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES).
METHODS
To establish a database of 412 foods derived from recipes of a 106-item FFQ, we followed a pre-established standardized protocol. This included the selection of source databases, matching of foods, substitution of unmatched items with identical foods and input of values, and assessment of coverage. For each food, the TAC was estimated by summing the individual antioxidant capacities, calculated by multiplying the amount of each antioxidant by its vitamin C equivalent antioxidant capacity.
RESULTS
We identified 48 antioxidants across 5 classes: retinol, carotenoids, vitamins C and E, and flavonoids, with flavonoids divided into 7 subclasses. TAC values were then established. Coverage exceeded 90.0% for retinol, carotenoids, vitamin C, and vitamin E, while coverage for flavonoids was 60.9%. The daily intakes of 4 antioxidant classes—all but vitamin E—were higher in women than in men. The Ansan-Ansung cohort exhibited the highest levels of dietary TAC, vitamin E, and flavonoids, while the Health Examinees Study cohort displayed the highest values for retinol, carotenoids, and vitamin C.
CONCLUSIONS
We customized a comprehensive antioxidant database for the KoGES FFQ, achieving relatively high coverage. This expansion could support research investigating the impact of dietary antioxidants on the development of chronic diseases targeted by the KoGES.


Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health